Coffee Meetup for ADHD Parents

Coffee Meetup for ADHD Parents

Come along and have a relaxing morning meeting and chatting with other ADHD parents.

This is a free event but you’ll need to purchase your own coffee.

Children welcome but no childcare provided.

If you are unable to attend the meet-up please join our Newsletter list to hear about future meetups, receive slides from speaker evenings and be kept up-to-date with future ADHD news & events.

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ADHD and Drumming

ADHD and Drumming

It has been said that the drums are one of the few instruments that access the entire brain, stimulating all the main sectors. Active engagement of practically playing rhythms aid in syncing the left and right hemispheres of the brain; leaving us feeling more connected with ourselves.

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Learning Difference Convention – Sydney

Learning Difference Convention – Sydney

The Learning Difference Convention was borne out of charitable efforts on the Central Coast NSW towards dyslexia awareness. The need to disseminate information, and bring the available support structures together to assist those dealing with dyslexia, became evident. The Learning Difference Convention is now a philanthropic event funded independently by its founder, Jillian Zocher.

Specific Learning Difficulties Specialist, Jillian Zocher, completed a Postgraduate Diploma in Specific Learning Difficulties in conjunction with the Helen Arkell Dyslexia Centre (UK) and the Oxford and Cambridge Royal Society of Arts in 2002, after many years of having taught at dyslexia friendly schools overseas. Jillian practices Educational Therapy on the Central Coast and teaches one on one to dyslexics across the age range.

What Do We Do

Neurological differences are to be recognised and respected as any other human variation. These differences can include those labelled with Dyspraxia, Dyslexia, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Dyscalculia, Autistic Spectrum, Tourette Syndrome, and others.

The Learning Difference Convention is the only event of its kind in Australia, linking delegates to support networks, teacher training, resources, research, authors and  information, all relating to learning differences.

The Learning Difference Convention recognises that a systematic, explicit and multi-sensory approach to reading is essential and that early intervention is key. Whilst we provide FREE resources to assist with reading, we recognise that dyslexia is more than just a reading difficulty and that dyslexics have varying needs, relative to their individual strengths and weaknesses.

This unique event allows us to share the plethora of information, whether it be reading, writing, spelling, co-ordination, concentration, auditory processing, mathematics, study skills, organisational skills, self-esteem difficulties, anxiety, social skills, behaviour, technology, visual processing, nutrition and more. The event allows you to ask the necessary questions, meet the experts and support groups and try out loads of resources.

The event has triggered a healthy debate, resulting in increased awareness, increased action, increased support, whilst inspiring unity between organisations and institutions.

The LDC offer support to parents, teachers, teacher aides and allied health professionals, for all three tiers of intervention – programs for classrooms/schools, programs for small groups and programs for those more severe who require one on one support.

LDC allows us to keep abreast with what is going on in the world of dyslexia, equipping us with the information to grow in our knowledge and understanding as educators in Australia.

LDC encourage delegates to view learners in a holistic way, focusing on strengths and individual needs, rather than only dwelling on weakness and labels in which to categorise them. Moving from labelling, to profiling, empowers us in our understanding, without relying on the services of an ‘expert’.

It is particularly important to note that various SpLD’s overlap; as students are likely to have one or more co-occurring difficulties. In developmental disorders co-existing difficulties is the rule rather than the exception.

Learning Difference Convention – Melbourne

Learning Difference Convention – Melbourne

The Learning Difference Convention was borne out of charitable efforts on the Central Coast NSW towards dyslexia awareness. The need to disseminate information, and bring the available support structures together to assist those dealing with dyslexia, became evident. The Learning Difference Convention is now a philanthropic event funded independently by its founder, Jillian Zocher.

Specific Learning Difficulties Specialist, Jillian Zocher, completed a Postgraduate Diploma in Specific Learning Difficulties in conjunction with the Helen Arkell Dyslexia Centre (UK) and the Oxford and Cambridge Royal Society of Arts in 2002, after many years of having taught at dyslexia friendly schools overseas. Jillian practices Educational Therapy on the Central Coast and teaches one on one to dyslexics across the age range.

What Do We Do

Neurological differences are to be recognised and respected as any other human variation. These differences can include those labelled with Dyspraxia, Dyslexia, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Dyscalculia, Autistic Spectrum, Tourette Syndrome, and others.

The Learning Difference Convention is the only event of its kind in Australia, linking delegates to support networks, teacher training, resources, research, authors and  information, all relating to learning differences.

The Learning Difference Convention recognises that a systematic, explicit and multi-sensory approach to reading is essential and that early intervention is key. Whilst we provide FREE resources to assist with reading, we recognise that dyslexia is more than just a reading difficulty and that dyslexics have varying needs, relative to their individual strengths and weaknesses.

This unique event allows us to share the plethora of information, whether it be reading, writing, spelling, co-ordination, concentration, auditory processing, mathematics, study skills, organisational skills, self-esteem difficulties, anxiety, social skills, behaviour, technology, visual processing, nutrition and more. The event allows you to ask the necessary questions, meet the experts and support groups and try out loads of resources.

The event has triggered a healthy debate, resulting in increased awareness, increased action, increased support, whilst inspiring unity between organisations and institutions.

The LDC offer support to parents, teachers, teacher aides and allied health professionals, for all three tiers of intervention – programs for classrooms/schools, programs for small groups and programs for those more severe who require one on one support.

LDC allows us to keep abreast with what is going on in the world of dyslexia, equipping us with the information to grow in our knowledge and understanding as educators in Australia.

LDC encourage delegates to view learners in a holistic way, focusing on strengths and individual needs, rather than only dwelling on weakness and labels in which to categorise them. Moving from labelling, to profiling, empowers us in our understanding, without relying on the services of an ‘expert’.

It is particularly important to note that various SpLD’s overlap; as students are likely to have one or more co-occurring difficulties. In developmental disorders co-existing difficulties is the rule rather than the exception.

Speaker: Dr Caroline Stevenson – Detentions, Suspensions and Expulsions – How to Manage ADHD in the School Environment

Dr Caroline Stevenson, ADHD Psychologist

Detentions, Suspensions and Expulsions – How to Manage ADHD in the School Environment

To enable children with AD/HD to perform to their potential their problems with attention, listening skills, organisation and impulsivity need to be addressed. Further, many children with AD/HD need movement to help them function.

Using punitive measures such as detentions and suspensions will not change the behaviour of children with significant weaknesses in their ability to complete tasks. To enhance the functioning of children with AD/HD – schools MUST address the issues that lead children to have difficulties in the classroom. This can be achieved by the use of classroom accommodations and adaptation of tasks so that children can experience success.

Caroline Stevenson is a Senior Clinical Psychologist. She has a private practice in Frenchs Forest two days per week. She is the Clinical Psychology Manager at Royal Far West.

Caroline has a long standing interest in AD/HD across the lifespan. She has been on the Board of AD/HD Australia and a past President of ADDults.

Under 18’s FREE ENTRY

If you are unable to attend the talk please join our Newsletter list to receive a copy of the slides and be kept up-to-date with future ADHD news & events.

Click here to subscribe:

http://eepurl.com/cgdNbz

The Positive Aspects of ADHD and Successful ADHD Adults

Finally, a study that can support my clients in moving forward! If you think it’s tough for kids with ADHD to thrive amongst the social stigma, then imagine how it feels for an adult with ADHD, given most of our population is not aware that ADHD may persist into adulthood.  Late last year a study was released called “Positive Aspects of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.”

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Why Can’t My Child with ADHD Sleep at Night?

WHY CAN’T MY CHILD WITH ADHD SLEEP AT NIGHT?

Does your child struggle to sleep each night?  Do they pop in and out of bed multiple times for a drink of water, to ask yet another “burning” question that can’t wait until the morning, or want another goodnight hug? Do they wake often in the night and have trouble re-settling themselves? Are they difficult to wake in the morning?

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Ten Top Sensory Processing Books

10 Top Sensory Processing Books

Does your child have a sensory processing disorder and do you or your child’s teacher want to better understand how to help them?

Occupational Therapy Helping Children’s Director, Lisa Hughes, has shared the best books for parents of kids with sensory processing issues. Read Lisa’s quick guide to help you navigate your way through the literature.

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